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Forschung Study

The negative impacts of father's long commute to work for children

Fathers’ commuting to work has multiple negative impacts on children’s behavior. Children whose fathers commute to work over a long distance tend to have more emotional and social problems. While the impact of commuting on employees has been extensively investigated, the study conducted by Jianghong Li and Matthias Pollmann-Schult from WZB Berlin Social Science Center is the first one to show the negative effects of commuting to work by fathers on the social and emotional well-being of German children. more
Forschung New study

Strong rights for churches hinder integration

The more support a government gives to Christian churches, the more likely its population is to express reservations about Muslim immigrants. This connections is proved by the political scientists Marc Helbling (WZB) and Richard Traunmüller (Goethe University, Frankfurt am Main). The protection of Christian holidays, the collection of church taxes, and the practice of denominational religious instruction in schools strengthen a Christian cultural identity and make it difficult to integrate other religious groups, the researchers write in an article for the new WZB-Mitteilungen issue. more
Presse Press release

A decisive factor for democracy: Female empowerment

Female empowerment is a core driver of democratization. Researchers from Western Australia and from the WZB Berlin Social Science Center draw this conclusion from an analysis of longitudinal data on 123 countries covering the period 1980 to 2005. Paula Wyndow, Jianghong Li, and Eugen Mattes question the widespread presumption that it is democratization that leads to improvements in women’s lives. Their findings suggest a reversed causality: Female educational attainment, women’s labour force participation, and low fertility rates jointly pave the way for moving a country towards democracy. more
Presse Study

When feeling poor makes you sick

Being objectively low income leads to poor health and a shorter life. This much we already knew. But poverty can also be a matter of subjectively feeling poor. WZB economist Maja Adena and her colleague Michal Myck (DIW Berlin and the Center for Economic Analysis, CenEA, Szczecin) have substantiated how the subjective assessment of being poor affects the health of the 50+ age group. A study of Germany and 11 other European countries shows that older people who assess themselves as poor get sick more often (38 per cent) andsuffer more from health setbacks (48 per cent) than those who do not. The probability of dying earlier is also much higher – around 40 per cent for men in this age group. more